Soon you will enjoy an online magazine dedicated to analog photography and analog video work.

Analog photography is photography that uses a progressively changing recording medium, which may be either chemical process based (e.g., photographic film or plate) or electronic (e.g., vidicon, CMOS or CCD sensor). For more than a hundred years, this was the only kind. -NOW- Analog photography has come to mean anything that is "not digital" despite some of controversy over the question of whether the use of film is a true analog process.
In a film camera that uses the gelatin-silver process, light falling upon photographic emulsions containing silver halides is recorded as a latent image. The latent image is subjected to photographic processing, which makes it visible and insensitive to light.
In a video camera or digital still camera, the signal is captured with a video camera tube or charge coupled device sensor, which sends the picture to be processed by the camera's electronics. The signal can be transmitted or recorded on a storage device for later playback.

Analog photography is frequently used as a title for those who are keen to work with, or do work with more traditional types of photography; dedicated online communities have been established in which like-minded individuals together share and explore historic photographic practices. Analog photography has become much more popular with younger generations who have become increasingly interested in the traditional photographic practice; sales in film-based cameras began to soar, and youth were seen to embrace some 19th-century technology.